L to R: Stephen Spence, Consultant, Arkitechs; Junior Mc Intyre, CTU CARCIP Programme Coordinator; Bernadette Lewis, Secretary General, CTU; Selby Wilson, Telecommunications Strategist, CTU; Mauro Miyake, OCP/SMC Lead Caribbean, Microsoft; Rafael Suarez- Cloud Specialist, Microsoft; and Lisette Hernandez, Territory Channel Manager, Microsoft.
OFFICIAL PHOTO OF THE 37TH EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
Front row, l-r: Nigel Cassimire, CTU Secretariat; Diana Francis, St. Kitts and Nevis; Hon. Vincent Byron Jr.; St. Kitts and Nevis; Bernadette Lewis, CTU Secretariat; Hon. Melford Nicholas, Antigua and Barbuda; Anthony McMaster, British Virgin Islands. Second row, l-r: Bevil Wooding, ARIN; Michelle Garcia, CTU Secretariat; Roxanne John, St. Vincent and the Grenadines; Decima Corea, St. Vincent and the Grenadines; Wendy Jap a Joe, Suriname; Amicia Mussenden, St. Kitts and Nevis; Valeenee Wasimin, Suriname; Sonia Culmer, The Bahamas; Darryl Jackson, Antigua and Barbuda; Imi Chitterman, Grenada. Third row, l-r: Trevor Prevatt, CTU Secretariat; Selby Wilson, CTU Secretariat; Stephen Bereaux, The Bahamas; Ophelia Blanchard, St. Kitts and Nevis; Vaughn Hazell, Anguilla; Vance Lewis, British Virgin Islands; Clifford Bostic, Barbados; Jeremy Hodge, British Virgin Islands; Bennette Thomas, Dominica; Williams Ijeh, ITU.

Minister Responsible for Telecommunications:
SENATOR, THE HON. CARL BETHEL, QC
Office of the Attorney General and Ministry of Legal Affairs
Permanent Secretary: MR. MARCO ROLLE

Population:  303,770 (July 2006)

Economy Overview

The Bahamas is a stable, developing nation with an economy heavily dependent on tourism and offshore banking. Tourism together with tourism-driven construction and manufacturing accounts for approximately 60% of GDP and directly or indirectly employs half of the archipelago’s labor force. Steady growth in tourism receipts and a boom in construction of new hotels, resorts, and residences had led to solid GDP growth in recent years, but the slowdown in the US economy and the attacks of 11 September 2001 held back growth in these sectors in 2001-03. The current government has presided over a period of economic recovery and an upturn in large-scale private sector investments in tourism. Financial services constitute the second-most important sector of the Bahamian economy, accounting for about 15% of GDP. However, since December 2000, when the government enacted new regulations on the financial sector, many international businesses have left The Bahamas. Manufacturing and agriculture together contribute approximately a tenth of GDP and show little growth, despite government incentives aimed at those sectors. Overall growth prospects in the short run rest heavily on the fortunes of the tourism sector, which depends on growth in the US, the source of more than 80% of the visitors.

GDP Per Capita: $20,200  (2005)

Communications

Telephone Main Lines in use: 139,900 (2004)

Telephone Mobile Cellular: 186,000 (2004)

Telephone System: General assessment: modern facilities
domestic: totally automatic system; highly developed
international: country code – 1-242; tropospheric scatter and submarine cable to Florida; 3 coaxial submarine cables; satellite earth station – 2 (2005)

Radio Broadcast Stations: AM 3, FM 5, shortwave 0 (2006)

Television Broadcast Stations: 2 (2006)

Internet Country Code: .bs

Internet Hosts: 561  (2006)

Internet users: 93,000  (2006)